Elizabeth FitzGerald, Countess of Lincoln

Called Frances de Vere, Actually Elizabeth FitzGerald, Countess of Lincoln

Called Lucy Neville, Actually Elizabeth FitzGerald, Countess of Lincoln

Elizabeth FitzGerald, Countess of Lincoln (c.1528-1590), attributed to Master of the Countess of Warwick, British, fl.1560s, National Gallery of Ireland

Called Frances de Vere, daughter of John de Vere, Earl of Oxford – Actually Elizabeth FitzGerald, Countess of Lincoln

Judith, Lady Jermyn, Boxted Hall (1575)

Judith Blagge, Lady Jermyn of Boxted Hall – Portrait of a Lady, thought to be Isabel Biddulph, née Gifford (c.1570-1575) by George Gower

The same woman?

«9. JUDITH, LADY JERMYN. H. and S. Body and face both full, hair dressed off the forehead, and jewelled tiara on top; small lace ruff. Dress: white with a baudekin pattern thereon; over it a black stomacher, and a black coat edged with a lace collar; four rows of gold chain round the neck. S. On panel. At top dexter corner, a coat of arms. Sable, a crescent between two mullets in pale, Jermyn; impaling, Argent, two bends gules, voided sable, the voids engrailed – for Blagge (Argent, two bends engrailed sable) – "Virtute contractum 1575."

Judith, daughter of Sir George Blagge and his wife Dorothy, daughter of William Badby. She married Sir Robert Jermyn of Rushbrooke. She died in 1614.» Portraits in Suffolk Houses (West) by Edmund Farrer (1848 – ?)

Text top left: Now thus, but like to change / and vade as dothe the floure / Whiche springe and bloomes full gay / and wytherethe in one houre. Portrait of a Lady, thought to be Isabel Biddulph, née Gifford (c.1570-1575) by George Gower – Wikipedia

According to the same Wikipedia article:

Provenance:

• By descent to Anthony J. Wright Biddulph, Burton Park, Petworth, Sussex

• His sale, Sotheby's, 9 December 1931, lot 31

• Lord Lee of Fareham (1868-1947)

• With Frank Partridge & Sons; sold 1 January 1939

• Sir Henry Price (1877-1963)

• Thence by descent

• With the Weiss Gallery, London, 2001

• Present whereabouts unknown

 

So the first known owner was Anthony J. Wright Biddulph, Burton Park, Petworth, Sussex, who got it by descent.

«Burton Park is a large estate held first by Gorings. Anne Goring, heiress of Sir Henry, married Richard Biddulph Esq. then Burton eventually passed to a Wright cousin from Essex who added the name Biddulph on inheriting. The house was originally a Tudor mansion but burnt down for the second time in 1826 and rebuilt.» Burton Park and West Sussex

«Henry Gage, Esq; fourth son of Sir John Gage, of Firle, Bart. (and younger brother to the said Sir Edward,) took to wife Henrietta Jermyn, daughter to Thomas, lord Jermyn, of Rushbrook, in Suffolk, and sister and coheir to Henry Jermyn, earl of Dover, by whom he had, Mary, a nun, and one son, John Gage, of Princethorp, in Norfolk, Esq;

Sir Thomas Gage, of Firle, Bart. (eldest son and heir of Sir John,) died about the year 1655, and having wedded Mary, eldest daughter and coheir of John Chamberlain, of Sherburn, in com. Oxon. Esq; (who, surviving him, was remarried to Sir Henry Goring, of Burton, in Sussex, Bart. and dying, 1694, was buried at Burton,)» The English Baronetage by Arthur Collins

Henrietta Jermyn was a direct descendant of Judith, Lady Jermyn. As none of her children had progeny (or appear to have married) (The History and Antiquities of Hengrave, in Suffolk by John Gage), it is entirely possible that a portrait inherited by her ended up with her sister-in-law Mary Chamberlain Gage Goring at Burton Park.

Catherine-Marie de Lorraine (18 July 1551 – 5 May 1596), Duchess of Montpensier?

Catherine-Marie de Lorraine (18 July 1551 – 5 May 1596), Duchess of Montpensier

Elizabeth Knollys, née Howard (1586–1658), Viscountess Wallingford, Later Countess of Banbury, c.1618–1620, attributed to Daniel Mytens (c.1590–1647), English Heritage, Kenwood

Elizabeth Knollys, née Howard (1586–1658), Viscountess Wallingford, Later Countess of Banbury?

Lady of the Boleyn Family, ca. 1620, attributed to Anthonis Mor

Lady Anne Clifford (1590–1676), Countess of Dorset, Later Countess of Pembroke and Montgomery

Portrait of a Lady, Said to be Mary Queen of Scots (1542–87) by Circle of Robert Peake the Elder

Renée d'Anjou, marquise de Mézières (1550–bef.1586/1597)

Renée d'Anjou, marquise de Mézières? – Portrait of a Young Lady by Circle of Francois Clouet – Philip Mould

Renée d'Anjou, marquise de Mézières? – Portrait of a Lady in a Red Dress by Follower of Clouet – Christie's

Maria of Parma by Circle of Anthonis Mor, c.1555

Maria of Portugal, Duchess of Parma (1538-1577)?

Margaret of Valois

Marguerite de Valois

Marguerite de Valois aka Reine Margot, daughter of Catherine de Médicis, sister of Henri III and wife of Henri IV

Unknown French Noblewoman – School of Clouet, 16th Century

Elisabeth of Austria, Queen of France, attributed to François Clouet, 1570

Called Lady Mary Fitzalan – Magdalen Dacre, Viscountess Montague?

Magdalen, Viscountess Montague (1538-1608), Manner of Antonis Mor (1517-1577)

Called Lady Mary Fitzalan – The Collection of the Duke of Norfolk

Magdalen, Viscountess Montague (1538-1608), Manner of Antonis Mor (1517-1577) – The Burghley Collections

«Magdalen was the daughter of William, Lord Dacre and the second wife of Anthony Browne, 1st Viscount Montague. A devout Catholic, she was a maid of honour at the marriage of Mary Tudor to Philip II of Spain in Winchester Cathedral. The Montagues were ancestors of Isabella Poyntz, wife of the 2nd Marquess of Exeter, and this portrait and its pair, were bought by the 2nd Marquess in 1844. They are now thought to have been painted posthumously in the 17th or 18th Century.

Antonis Mor, a Dutch portrait painter, was much sought after by the Courts of Europe.»

Anthony Browne, 1st Viscount Montague (1526-1592), Manner of Antonis Mor

Anthony Browne, 1st Viscount Montague (1526-1592), Manner of Antonis Mor (1517-1577)

«Anthony Browne, an ancestor of Isabella Poyntz, wife of the 2nd Marquess of Exeter, was created 1st Viscount Montague in 1554. He was one of the peers who sat at the trial of Mary, Queen of Scots in 1587. This painting, and its pair, were bought by the 2nd Marquess in 1844 and are now thought to be posthumous portraits dating from the 17th or 18th Century, based on lost originals.»

Anthony Browne, 1st Viscount Montague (1526-1592), Manner of Antonis Mor (1517-1577) – The Burghley Collections

The pendant to the portrait of Magdalen Dacre, Viscountess Montague (1538-1608).

Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk

Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk – The companion portrait to the one of 'Mary FitzAlan' above.

The 'Mary FitzAlan' Portrait in Purple – Believed to be due to a printing technique of a post card

Queen Mary I of England (1516 - 1558), 17th century (painted), After Anthonis Mor – Victoria and Albert Museum

Mary I (1516-1558), c.1800-65, After Anthonis Mor – RCIN 406156

At least the first one of these, the one in the Victoria and Albert Museum, is probably from the same studio as the one that produced the paintings of Magdalen Dacre and 'Mary FitzAlan' above.

Queen Mary I of England (1516 - 1558) – Victoria and Albert Museum

«Description

This nineteenth-century portrait of Mary I derives from the same source as RCIN 404739 and shows the Tudor Queen resting her hand on a chair and holding a handkerchief in her left hand.

Provenance

Painted for Queen Victoria as part of a set of royal portraits at St James's Palace.»

Mary I (1516-1558), c.1800-65, After Anthonis Mor – The Royal Collection | RCIN 406156

Portrait of a Tudor Lady in a Rich Costume, Flemish School, early 1570’s

Portrait of a Young Lady, 1560, by Caterina van Hemessen

Regina Streun, née von Tschernembl

It's possible these are all the same woman, Regina Streun, née von Tschernembl. Certainly I think the first two portraits were painted by the same artist.

Portrait of a Tudor Lady in a Rich Costume, Flemish School, early 1570’s

«Both the artist and the sitter for this jewel-like painting are, as yet, unknown. Once thought to be Mary Tudor, her cousin, Mary, Queen of Scots has also been suggested. However, the subject is, most probably, a high-born Flemish lady circa 1570.»

Portrait of a Tudor Lady in a Rich Costume, Flemish School, early 1570’s – The Burghley Collections

Portrait of a Young Lady, 1560, by Caterina van Hemessen – Wikipedia

Portrait of a Young Lady, 1560, by Caterina van Hemessen – The Baltimore Museum of Art

Portrait of a Young Lady, 1560, by Caterina van Hemessen – The New York Times

Regina Streun, née von Tschernembl, was the second wife of Reichard Streun von Schwarzenau (1538 – 1600).

«Regina Streun, geb. von Tschernembl Dieses Bild: 014135 Kunstwerk: Deckfarbenmalerei ; Folge ; Porträt ; Wien Dokumentation: 1575 ; 1585 ; Wien ; Österreich ; Wien ; Kunsthistorisches Museum ; IN 9691 ; fol. 611»

Portrait of lady, half-length, in white bejewelled dress and headress by circle of Frans Pourbus the Younger

Margaretha von Holzhausen, 1565

Portrait of a Lady, Traditionally Identified as Mary Tudor (1496-1533), by a Follower of Anthonis Mor – Actually Margaretha von Holzhausen?

Margaretha von Holzhausen, 1565 – Städel Museum

Portrait of a Lady, Traditionally Identified as Mary Tudor (1496-1533), by a Follower of Anthonis Mor. «By descent in the Hesketh family, Heslington Hall, Yorkshire, to Anne, daughter and co-heir of Thomas Hesketh of Heslington (d. 1708), who married in 1692 Lieutenant Colonel James Yarburgh (d. 1728) of Snaith Hall, Yorkshire» – Sotheby's

Actually Margaretha von Holzhausen? As grown? The lady has the same little chipmunk cheeks and her other features as the girl Margaretha von Holzhausen.

The Gripsholm Portrait

Archduchess Maria of Austria, Duchess of Jülich-Cleves-Berg

The Gripsholm Portrait, thought to be Elizabeth by ? – Actually Archduchess Maria of Austria, Duchess of Jülich-Cleves-Berg?

Archduchess Maria of Austria, Duchess of Jülich-Cleves-Berg in 1554 – Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna

I am wondering if the Gripsholm Portrait, rather than portraying Queen Elizabeth I of England, is not of Archduchess Maria of Austria (1531–1581), Duchess of Jülich-Cleves-Berg, daughter of Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand I from the House of Habsburg and Anna of Bohemia and Hungary.

Certainly this is not Elizabethan fashion. The flat little hat is typical Austrian fashion for the time, more specifically typical Austrian fashion for the unhappy daughters of Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor from the House of Habsburg. They are all pictured with it at some point. The straight shapeless gown that does not conform to the contours of the body and the almost too-big overcoat are perfectly in keeping with this style as well. Maria was born on the 15th of May 1531, which means that the portrait would have been painted between the 15th of May 1561 and 16th of May 1562.

1563 Gripsholm portrait thought to be Elizabeth by ? (Gripsholm Slott - Strängnäs, Södermanland Sweden)

Archduchess Maria of Austria, Duchess of Jülich-Cleves-Berg in 1554 – Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna

Gripsholm Castle – Since Gustav Vasa, Gripsholm has belonged to the Swedish Royal Family and was used as one of their residences until the 18th century. It is now a museum, but it is still considered to be a palace at the disposal of the King and as such it is part of the Crown palaces in Sweden.

The current King of Sweden is directly descended from Maria of Austria (1531–1581), Duchess of Jülich-Cleves-Berg is at least five ways. Through her daughter Marie Eleonore, she was ancestor of Marie Louise of Hesse-Kassel, wife of John William Friso, Prince of Orange therefore ancestor of all the current European monarchs.

This shows how the Swedish King, Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden, is descended from Marie Louise of Hesse-Kassel, herself the descendant of Maria of Austria (1531–1581), Duchess of Jülich-Cleves-Berg.

An even earlier link between the desendants of Maria of Austria (1531–1581), Duchess of Jülich-Cleves-Berg and the Swedish Royal family was the marriage between Maria Eleonora of Brandenburg (11 November 1599 – 28 March 1655) and King Gustav II Adolph of Sweden. She was Queen of Sweden as the consort of King Gustav II Adolph, the great-granddaughter of Maria of Austria and the mother of Queen Christina of Sweden.

In fact, Gripsholm Castle was the dower residence of Maria Eleonora of Brandenburg as the widow of Gustav Adolph of Sweden, she lived there from 1636 until 1640. In May 1625 she had also given birth to a stillborn son at Gripsholm Castle.

Queen Christina was determined to never marry, and when she abdicated, she left the throne to her cousin Charles X Gustav of Sweden, also a descendant of Maria of Austria (1531–1581), Duchess of Jülich-Cleves-Berg. She was his great-grandmother as well.

His bloodline held the throne until 1751, when Adolf Frederick from the House of Holstein-Gottorp ascended the throne.

He too was a direct lineal ascendant of Maria of Austria (1531–1581), Duchess of Jülich-Cleves-Berg.

Adolf Frederick's grandson Gustav IV Adolf of Sweden married another direct descendant of Maria of Austria (1531–1581), Duchess of Jülich-Cleves-Berg, Frederica of Baden.

Adolf Frederick's bloodline held the throne until 1818. The next king was Jean-Baptiste Jules Bernadotte, the first monarch of the present royal family. In a series of dynastic marriages the Bernadottes would marry into the old bloodlines. Sophia of Nassau (1836–1913) who married Oscar II of Sweden, Victoria of Baden (1862–1930) who married Gustaf V of Sweden, and Princess Sibylla of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (1908–1972) who married Prince Gustaf Adolf, Duke of Västerbotten, were all direct lineal descendants of Maria of Austria (1531-1581), Duchess of Jülich-Cleves-Berg. 

EDITED TO ADD:

Since writing the above, I have come across a photograph of the portrait in a better resolution. It was in fact painted in 1563, making the identification as Elizabeth I Tudor give more sense, as she was naturally precisely 30 years old in 1563.

The fashions are still entirely wrong, however, and I still don't believe that it's her.

When researching this portrait I also considered Catherine Jagiellon (1 November 1526 – 16 September 1583), who was Queen of Sweden at this time, her two sisters, with whom she was close, Anna (18 October 1523 – 9 September 1596) and Sophia (13 July 1522 – 28 May 1575), and her sister-in-law Catherine of Austria (15 September 1533 – 28 February 1572), Queen of Poland, with whom she and her sister Anna were close.

Now, knowing with certainty that the lady was 30 years old in 1563 naturally eliminates both Maria of Austria (1531-1581), Duchess of Jülich-Cleves-Berg and Catherine Jagiellon (1526–1583), Queen of Sweden (and her two sisters) as the sitter.

In 1556, when her sister Sophia married and left for Germany and her mother departed for Italy, Catherine Jagellion and her sister Anna were moved to the Palace of Vilnius by their brother Sigismund II Augustus of Poland, to ensure a royal presence in Lithuania. Their stay in Vilnius was described as happy, living in a palace and a court strongly influenced by the Italian Renaissance: Catherine and Anna were allowed to compose their own separate households, and socialized with the aristocracy. In Vilnius too resided Catherine of Austria, Queen of Poland, their sister-in-law.

It seems that the three women became close. All three had Vilnius as their main place of residence until October 1562 and the wedding of Catherine Jagiellon to Duke John of Finland.

Catherine of Austria was sent to Radom in April 1563 by her 40-year-old husband Sigismund II Augustus of Poland. He sought to obtain annulment of the marriage as he wanted to marry for the fourth time and secure a male heir.

At the same time, between 1563 and 1567, Catherine Jagiellon and her husband John was imprisoned by his brother King Eric XIV in Gripsholm Castle. John's son Sigismund, later the King of Poland and Sweden, was born in Gripsholm Castle on the 20th of June 1566.

Catherine's captivity was a lenient one, however, and if a portrait had been sent to her as a gift at this point she would no doubt have been allowed to receive it. King Eric XIV had no desire to offend either Catherine's family.

It was a time of great turmoil for both Catherines, as well as being shortly after they had been separated in October 1562, after six years as friends and family in each other's close vicinity. Catherine of Austria, Queen of Poland must have been worried both for her own future and quite possibly for the safety of Catherine Jagellion, Queen of Sweden in her captivity.

People have done stranger things under such circumstances than to send a portrait of themselves to be remembered by, as a solace in the form of an offering of remembered friendship and familial love in a difficult situation, and in order to confirm bonds of kinship.

Catherine of Austria (1533–1572), Queen of Poland was also the two years younger sister of Maria of Austria (1531–1581), Duchess of Jülich-Cleves-Berg.

Above is outlined very clearly how the Gripsholm Portrait if a portrait of the childless Catherine of Austria could have come to Sweden by way of inheritance through the descendants of her sister Maria, if it were not in fact a gift to her treasured sister-in-law Catherine Jagiellon (1526–1583), who was Queen of Sweden and actually living at Gripsholm Castle in 1563.

Catherine of Austria (15 September 1533 – 28 February 1572), Queen of Poland

The Gripsholm Portrait of a lady who was 30 years old in 1563, just like Catherine of Austria, Queen of Poland was